February 20, 2009

Aidric's Stats
Kemer, Turkey

Tatiana took our son to a Miami doctor for a routine checkup, and to see how his height and weight were relative to each other.

We knew Aidric was a tall kid—bigger than any other we've seen his age—but according to Tatiana, the stats on our 13-month-old are pretty wild: He's as tall as an average 20-month-old, and as heavy as an average 18-month-old!

Yeesh! Certainly not travel-sized, is he?!

Comments:

Canada

Maya

March 24th, 2009

man!!! he is going to kick your butt in no time!

The United States

Bo

March 24th, 2009

Don't believe hte charts. They're meaningless. Instead, focus on his motor skills, his ability to pick up things, his curiousity level. They're the real indicators of how he's doing.

The United States

Erik

March 24th, 2009

I concur about ignoring the charts - they're interesting but as he develops, he may be anywhere in between two extremes. Young children are usually all over the charts which is what gives that median type of chart scale.

Peru

Tatiana

March 25th, 2009

Charts cannot be that "meaningless" if they have been developed by the World Health Organization after years of research. Out of all the many ways to measure the different aspects of child development, this one is by far the most objective and clear. If your baby is underweight then it means you, as a parent, are doing something wrong in regards to his or her feedings. It has always been our concern to offer our son balanced meals, we have accomplished that. The chart is a concrete proof that we're doing good in that sense, so we're happy, it does mean something to us. His social-emotional development has been the least of our worries because he's been doing great from the very begining. I am currently taking him to a nursery school and I have been told that he is socially and emotionally as developed as a 2-year old, except for his speech that is a little delayed. We had been expecting this, though. Studies show that this is very common among babies raised bilingually, they need this extra time to "clasify" the language input. What we are very curious to find out is the future role of all the languages he has been exposed to. I imagine he will kick my butt!

Canada

Maya

March 26th, 2009

yeap, dont worry…. he is going to start a little slow in the language part BUT, at the once, once they start, NO ONE WILL STOP THEM.. not sure if this is good or bad news jajajajaja i can also add that children raised bilingually tend to express their feelings in a better way too, be more reflective about comnunications and about their own emotional experience.. probably, because at the end, they end up with 2 ways of communicate the same thing, so if they see something is not going right in one way,. they'll try another one. They dont learn 2 languages, they learn 2 ways of expression, one for mommy, one for daddy, we know that those are languages, they dont…

Note: Comments are open to everyone. To reduce spam and reward regular contributors, only submissions from first-time commenters and/or those containing hyperlinks are moderated, and will appear after approval. Hateful or off-topic remarks are subject to pruning. Your e-mail address will never be publicly disclosed or abused.